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Shamim. 22. Hat stall between Ravenclaw and Hufflepuff. Art lover, avid archer, and Jane Eyre enthusiast. Professional daydreamer and future adventurer.

matterofawesome:

i-signed-up-for-this:

Hero Defense Squad: HERO NO BABY!!! KILL CLAUDIO. KILL PEDRO. KILL JOHN. KILL ALL THE MEN WHO DARE HARM THE GODDESS.

Theorists: Okay guys maybe I’m imagining this but on my twentieth time watching I think I heard Hero cough. I think she might be dying. However, that means the moms would have to come home, which will disturb the plot.

Ben Fans: YASSSSS BEN YOU TELL THAT CAMERA GIRL TO STOP RECORDING YASSSSS BEN YOU LOOK SOOOOOOO GOOOOOOOD

october 31st: SPOOOOOOKKKKKY!!!!!!!!!!! buy candy and scaaaary costumes here!!!
november 1st: JUST HEAR THOSE SLEIGH BELLS JINGLING RING TING TINGLING TOOOOOO
Hero Defense Squad: HERO NO BABY!!! KILL CLAUDIO. KILL PEDRO. KILL JOHN. KILL ALL THE MEN WHO DARE HARM THE GODDESS.
Theorists: Okay guys maybe I'm imagining this but on my twentieth time watching I think I heard Hero cough. I think she might be dying. However, that means the moms would have to come home, which will disturb the plot.
Ben Fans: YASSSSS BEN YOU TELL THAT CAMERA GIRL TO STOP RECORDING YASSSSS BEN YOU LOOK SOOOOOOO GOOOOOOOD

Oh no.
I have fallen in love.

itsstuckyinmyhead:

Odd Romeo and Juliet Tumblr Posts

sixpenceee:

Horror/halloween food

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allinablur:

Portuguese history meme — six pairings [1/6]

King Pedro I and Inês de Castro

If in the English-speaking world Shakespeare’s fictional Romeo and Juliet are the epitome of tragic lovers, in Portugal there was the true story of Pedro and Inês. Throughout the centuries this story caught the attention of several European writers and artists.

Inês Pérez de Castro (ca. 1320-1355) was the daughter of the powerful Pedro Fernández de Castro, an illegitimate grandson of King Sancho IV of Castile. She arrived in Portugal in 1340 as a lady-in-waiting to her cousin, Infanta Constança of Castile, who was to marry the heir to the Portuguese throne, Dom Pedro (son of King Dom Afonso IV). But immediately the crown prince set his eyes on Inês’ “heron neck,” he was in love with the noble lady. Even though he married the Castilian Infanta in 1340, he began to neglect his lawful wife and focussed his attention on Inês.

In a cunning manoeuvre aimed at putting an end to her husband’s love affair, Constança invited Inês to be the godmother of her newly born son, Infante Dom Luís (who lived just a few weeks), as in the eyes of the Catholic Church, this would make Inês a member of the family and would render her affair with Dom Pedro incestuous. However, the Princess’ scheme did not have the desired effect; despite her efforts, as well as the King’s later attempts to separate the lovers (by banishing Inês from Court and sending her back to Castile in 1344), the feelings of the couple for each other did not subside, and Pedro continued to visit Inês when she was away from the kingdom. Dona Constança, on the other hand, did not have long to live. She died on 13 November 1345, a couple of weeks after giving birth to her third child.

Once he was no longer married, Dom Pedro went after Inês, brought her back to Portugal and settled her in Coimbra, where they would live together openly. The lovers were closer than ever, and they went on to have four children (three survived). Meanwhile, the Prince became increasingly close to Inês’ brothers (Álvaro and Fernando de Castro), who tried to convince him to claim the throne of Castile, thus endangering the already fragile relations between Portugal and that neighbouring kingdom. Soon the Prince (also a grandson of King Sancho IV of Castile) was persuaded by their arguments and declared himself a pretender to the thrones of León and Castile, taking advantage of the weak position of his cousin, Pedro of Castile, due to the intrigues created by the bastards of Alfonso XI.

It became evident to the Portuguese King and aristocracy that the Castro clan would end up dragging the future monarch and his kingdom into the dynastic fights of their neighbours. Moreover, Dom Afonso IV and his courtiers secretly feared that at some time in the future Inês’ sons would impugn the legitimacy of Infante Dom Fernando (the surviving son of Pedro and Constança), causing a civil war. Even worse, they were concerned that the Castros might make an attempt on the life of this frail little heir.

These fearsome prospects led the King and his advisers to look for ways to free the Prince from the damaging influence of the Castro clan, and the death of Inês started to be seen as a solution. Initially, Dom Afonso IV was reluctant to agree to such an extreme action against the mother of his grandchildren, but on 7 January 1355 (while Pedro was away from home), the King called his counsellors to a meeting in the Castle of Montemor-o-Velho, at the end of which he finally decided to send three of his courtiers - Pêro Coelho, Álvaro Gonçalves and Diogo Lopes Pacheco - to Coimbra, in order to kill Inês.

According to Cristóvão Rodrigues Acenheiro’s Chronicles, as soon as they arrived, Inês appeared surrounded by her children and appealed to the Dom Afonso IV, who was thus struggling between the needs of the state and his feelings as a grandparent. Finally, he left the room, saying to the counsellors: “Do whatever you want”. As soon as the King had turned his back, the sentence was carried out: Inês de Castro was executed.

Although the assassination took place in Santa Clara-a-Velha (where the couple had been living together since Constança’s death), the myth associates Inês’ tragedy with the Quinta das Lágrimas [Estate of Tears], and people believe that her blood still stains the red stone-bed of the spring on this estate, where she is said to have cried out for the last time, while being pierced by the daggers of the executioners.

When Dom Pedro heard that Inês had been killed, the terrible news drove him into a fury. Knowing that his father had ordered the killing, Dom Pedro staged a revolt against the King. For several months, with the support of the Castro brothers, his troops swept through the country and laid siege to the city of Porto. Finally, the Queen intervened to end the revolt and bring about a reconciliation between father and son, who formally promised to forgive the incident.

But two years later, Dom Afonso IV died and Dom Pedro succeeded to the Portuguese throne. As soon as he was crowned in 1357, and in spite of his promises of forgiveness, King Dom Pedro I recovered two of Inês’ assassins from Castile, where they had sought refuge (the third had escaped to France). He then had them tortured and executed in a barbaric but highly symbolic way: from one of the men who had killed the love of his life, the heart was ripped out of the body through his back, and from the other, the heart was pulled out through the chest. All this happened in front of the Royal Palace, where the King was able to watch the terrible scene while having dinner!

On 12 June 1360, the King announced that, some years earlier, he had secretly married Inês. The bishop of Guarda, Dom Gil, and one of his servants, Estêvão Lobato, were presented as witnesses of the wedding - although nobody seemed to remember the date when it had taken place. Nevertheless, Inês de Castro was declared Dom Pedro’s legitimate wife and therefore the lawful Queen of Portugal. The King then ordered her body to be exhumed and taken from the Monastery of Santa Clara in Coimbra to the Monastery of Alcobaça (the tomb of kings), where she was buried in an extraordinary ceremony, on 2 April 1361.

Afterwards, the accounts of Pedro’s actions mix reality with legend. Some say that the tomb was placed opposite Pedro’s own grave, so that they could look into each other’s eyes on the day of the last judgment. Others go even further and say that, once in Alcobaça, Pedro had Inês placed on the throne, put the royal crown on the skull, and forced the entire court to swear allegiance to the dead Queen, by kissing the hand of the corpse. One thing is known for sure: the eighth King of Portugal was moved by strong feelings that united him to the queen of his heart and, according to the royal chronicler Fernão Lopes, he was consumed by a “great madness”.

By an ironic fancy of Destiny, Constança’s son would be the last king of the First Dynasty, while the heir of the new king, Dom Duarte (Pedro I’s grandson), would marry, in 1428, Dona Leonor of Aragon, herself a great-granddaughter of Inês de Castro… [x] or [x] (cached page)

romantic-cactus:

mszombi:

creepsvillecentral666:

Reasons why October is the best month:

  • Cold but dry weather 
  • Everything is pretty colours
  • Pumpkin pie
  • Pumpkin coffee
  • Everything being made to look spooky
  • Horror movies on TV all the time
  • Halloween
  • Jumper weather
  • Dressing up as scary things
  • Hot drinks
  • Lots of sweets

The smell of dying leaves

If u don’t like October get the FUCK outta my house

Entire nation of Australia growls